Five Best Practices for Infographics Reply

 Infographics are a popular and effective way for industrial marketers to communicate information. Why does everyone love infographics? Because the best ones provide fast, easy access to important information. Our brains require less effort to digest visual content than text, and visual content drives more traffic and engagement than plain text does.

Here’s an example of three infographics from IHS Engineering360: an Infographic 3 Pack. Each one summarizes a set of research data that was also used to produce a white paper and other content. See how much you can learn from a quick scan of the infographic?

But as with any other type of content, some infographics are better at getting the job done than others. Make sure you adhere to these best practices when using infographics as part of your content marketing efforts.

1. Tell a visual story
You can’t simply assemble a collection of data and statistics and call it an infographic. Your infographics should tell a visual story that has a main theme or objective. It should adhere to both a logical and a visual flow. To determine the story you want to tell, ask yourself the following questions:
• What am I trying to communicate?
• What are the main points of the story?
• What should my audience learn?
• What do I want my audience to feel, think or do? (include a call to action)

2. Choose a compelling topic
Like a white paper, webinar or other marketing content, infographics must be interesting and relevant to your audience. Timeliness is also a factor with infographics. What’s happening right now in your industry? What research, data and statistics support your story and are compelling to your audience?

Dig deep into your research to uncover data behind key trends you want to tell a story about. Be sure that you cite the data sources that you use. You can either integrate the citations where the data appears or use some kind of footnoting and put citations at the end.

3. Adhere to design principles
Because infographics are so visual in nature, it’s essential that you create a harmonious and pleasing design that is attractive to your audience. Follow these principles:
• Keep visual elements such as icons as simple as possible. Complex designs are distracting and hard to understand. They also might not render well in small sizes. The same goes for fonts. Use simple, clean typography. Try to stick to one or two fonts and a limited number of font sizes.
• Choose a complementary color palette and group related information by color. But don’t use too many colors. You don’t want the infographic to look like a circus.
• Use white space. If you clutter up the entire canvas with information, your audience will be overwhelmed and won’t know where to look next. White space helps segment information and create a visual flow that moves your story in the right direction.
• Use a vertical, not a horizontal, layout. Your audience can scroll down as needed to see information below the limits of the screen, but horizontal scrolling is difficult. A good rule of thumb is to make your infographic no wider than 600 pixels.
• Use brief blocks of text to support or explain visuals. The main story should be told through the graphic elements; consider text as secondary and keep it to a minimum.

4. Create your infographics
Not everyone is an artist. If you’re not a designer, you can take advantage of online tools that let you create visually powerful infographics from templates. Or reach out to your media partners that offer content marketing services – infographic development may also be on their list of product offerings. One benefit of relying on a media partner for assistance versus using online tools is that they can help you with both the design, as well as identifying and organizing the right data and content.

5. Market your infographics
Infographics are for sharing. Be sure to add social sharing buttons to your infographics, along with your logo and a call to action. In addition, promote your infographics as you would any other content as part of your integrated marketing program. Post them to your website, link to them from emails, use them to pitch articles to editors, and highlight them on your social media accounts.

Also think about ways you can use the content of infographics in other ways. The infographics examples mentioned above from IHS Engineering360 were created from research reports. Repurposing content can flow in the other direction as well. Can elements of your infographics be used as slides in a presentation? Or as the basis of an executive brief or article? Smart marketers are always finding ways to effectively repurpose content.

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