Beyond Email Marketing: 3 More Ways to Use Email

Email remains a popular and proven marketing tool for connecting with your target audience. Seventy-four percent of industrial marketers are using email marketing to internal lists as a marketing tactic in 2013, making it the most widely-used marketing tactic, as reported in the 2013 Trends in Industrial Marketing survey.

These emails primarily take the form of a regular e-newsletter or a concentrated email campaign to push products or promote content (white papers, webinars, etc.). That’s a good use of this channel as industrial professionals respond to email. But did you know there are other ways, beyond traditional marketing, that your company can use email to help distribute your message, build your brand, and strengthen customer relationships?

As a marketer, you should work with each of these groups to help achieve overall company goals and objectives:

1. Emails from the sales team
You should already have in place a process for transitioning sales-ready leads from the marketing department to sales. But just because a lead belongs to sales now, it doesn’t mean that marketing ends. Every email that a salesperson sends to a customer or prospect is an opportunity to nurture a lead, polish your brand image, and put your company in a strong position to win business.

Make sure your sales team has easy access to marketing content they might want to offer to customers and prospects in their one-on-one emails. A good strategy is to distribute to the sales team a list of links to marketing content, categorized by type and purpose of content, as well as copy that can be used to describe the benefits of viewing or downloading the content. Your salesperson can simply copy this text and the link into an email. With the sales people using the same or similar messaging as the marketing team, you can help reinforce your branding.

Another opportunity is to work with sales people to develop an email signature line that includes links to relevant content or highlights the latest important news. This signature line—with content and links following the salesperson’s contact information—can be updated on a regular basis and distributed to your sales team. Also, don’t forget to include links to your social pages in signatures lines, or a link to your online catalog.

2. Emails from customer service/tech support
Your support teams have regular contact with customers, which provides another excellent opportunity for marketing to get involved. Your customer service teams should have access to the same messaging and links to content that the sales team has at its disposal, and you can also help with signature lines as well.

Customer service emails are also a great way to ask customers questions about your products and services. You can include a poll question right in the email, or invite your customers to take a survey to measure satisfaction or generate product “wish-lists.” Be sure to offer some type of modest incentive for completing the survey, anything from a coffee card to a discount on their next purchase.

3. Automated emails as follow-ups
Whether you use a third-party email marketing service or have an internal email marketing solution, you should have the capability to send automated emails to customers and prospects when they perform an action, such as submitting a form on your website. Signing up for your newsletter, downloading a white paper or other content, registering for a webinar—all of these are opportunities to send something more effective than a generic thank you email.

You can tailor your response depending on the context of the submitted form. Give new e-newsletter subscribers links to past newsletters or articles about your company. Provide links to popular pages. Put contact information in these emails in case a prospect wants to speak with someone right away. If a customer downloads a white paper on a specific topic, offer them descriptions and links to other related content. If they sign up for a webinar, show them the way to past webinars they can view on demand.

The point is to not waste any of your email communications. Every touch point is an opportunity to improve relationships and do better than your competitors. Customers will remember what company is most helpful to them—make sure it’s your company.

How are you using email beyond the marketing department? What tips and ideas about using email would you pass along to your peers in industrial marketing? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

1 Comment

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  1. Yeorgios Tsomkopoulos
    02. Nov, 2013 at 10:48 am #

    A CRM platform is a good mean for organizing and keeping track on all the above

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