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Five Tips for Differentiating Your Business from Competitors

Every market today is a busy, crowded, competitive market. In the industrial sector, many companies offer similar products, components and services. The quest to stand out from the crowd and differentiate from your competitors is a difficult challenge, but once overcome will help you gain a stronger, more recognizable position in the market.

Here are five tips to help you create differentiation, and distance, from your competitors:

Differentiating your company from competitors is not easy but will help your position in the marketplace.
Differentiating your company from competitors is not easy but will help your position in the marketplace.

1. Know your enemy

This saying, taken from Sun Tzu's The Art of War, may be on the dramatic side, but for industrial companies it means that in order to differentiate from your competitors you must first study and know them. What are their strengths and weaknesses? How do they position their company and offerings? What promises do they make in their marketing? How are they perceived in the industry?
Getting answers to these questions allows you to focus on how you are different and what you do better than your competitors. You need to find those key attributes that set you apart.

2. Stick to your mission statement and core values

The relationship between companies and mission statements can take one of three forms: 1) the company doesn’t believe in mission statements, perhaps thinking they’re a waste of time; 2) the company takes the time to craft a mission statement but then basically ignores it; or 3) the company takes its mission statement seriously, putting energy and resources into understanding the organization’s purpose and core values, what it hopes to achieve, and how to achieve it.

Be that third company. A solid mission statement can help focus your company, provide a framework for evaluating whether opportunities fit your business model and strategy, establish your brand, and give your employees core values to embrace.

A mission statement should be short, simple and specific. Avoid industry buzzwords. Avoid saying what any other company might say, and instead focus on what’s unique and special about your company. If you don’t already have a mission statement and need inspiration, visit the websites of the companies you admire most (industrial, b-to-b, consumer or otherwise) and check out how they have positioned their businesses.

3. Be innovative

A sure way to separate your company from your competitors is to do something innovative. It may be on the product side—being first to market with a new technology or product is a huge differentiator. But there are other ways to be innovative. You could make a name for your company by implementing innovative customer service, warranty or replacement policies that are unique in your industry. You can open a “virtual university” to share technical expertise with the customers, the market or even engineering students. You can be the company that sponsors an online discussion forum for engineers.

4. Tell a compelling story

Every company has a unique and compelling story to tell. What’s yours? Started by a couple of engineers in a garage? Successful merger of two unlikely marriage partners? Built from the ground up by a visionary who identified an unmet customer need? More and more these days, customers are digging deeper into a company’s history before choosing to do business with it. They’re looking for a company with a strong pedigree and satisfied customers. A company they can trust. A company that has that extra something special. Your company does have that extra something that your competitors don’t. Find out what it is. Tell your story. Publish it on your website. Include it in communications.

5. Reinforce though marketing

You know what makes your company unique and different from your competitors. Now you need to repeat and reinforce that message in your marketing efforts. Extract those couple of words or compelling messages and repeat them through social media, content marketing, e-newsletters, banner ads, boilerplates, webinars, and other forms of marketing. Do this often enough, do it right, and back it up, and you will become known as the company that offers the highest quality products, the fastest delivery of custom orders, or best customer support. Or the company with the greatest technical expertise, the most creative problem solvers, the most experienced consultants . . . or whatever differentiates you from competitors and secures your unique position in the market.

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Using Buyer Personas to Find More Customers

Buyer personas are fictional representations of your ideal customers that offer real-world benefits and are extremely useful to your marketing efforts. They can be used to develop targeted content for different customer types, craft relevant and compelling messaging, and help unite your sales, marketing and service teams by sharing a greater understanding of your customers. Buyer personas can even help guide product development efforts.

Biomedical engineers.
Buyer personas of your ideal customers offer real-world benefits and help your marketing efforts such as content, messaging, and more.

How to start

The raw material for developing buyer personas can come from multiple sources. It may be enough to rely on anecdotal experience from your sales team or other institutional knowledge regarding the goals and needs of your customers. However, you may want to engage in research or use other data to get a richer, more comprehensive persona. Many companies use demographic data as part of their buyer personas. Others conduct surveys or one-to-one customer interviews. You can also use online or offline behavior patterns to help fill out a persona. You may even have a good deal of this information on hand from other analytic efforts, such as tracking website visitors or content from case studies.

What to include

Buyer personas don’t need to be complex or long. They should contain only information that is useful to your marketing efforts. Develop a separate persona for each type of customer that you have. If you only have one type of customer, you only need one buyer persona. If you have many types of customers, or if many people are involved in the purchase decision for your products (such as recommenders, influencers, users, and purchasing agents), you should develop a buyer persona for each type.

Here is some of the typical information you might include in a buyer persona:

  • Profile. The type and title of the technical professional who is interested in your products. An engineer (design, process, production), a department head or a team lead, a senior manager, and so on. What are their professional duties and areas of responsibility?
  • Challenges. What problem is your customer attempting to solve? How is this problem negatively impacting them? What are the consequences of not solving it?
  • Goals. What benefits do they hope to achieve with the sought-after product/solution?
  • Obstacles/Objections. What might prevent your customer from buying your product/solution? For example: financial constraints, strong competitive offerings, lack of confidence in your solution or perceived weaknesses, support or warranty issues.
  • Value proposition. What solution are you offering and how does it address the challenges, meet the goals, and overcome the obstacles/objections of your profiled customer?

Create a template

Once you have decided what information you need to collect in order to develop buyer personas, create a one-page template that you can complete for each type of persona. A template is a smart choice because it allows you to maintain consistency and have the same fields for each persona, such as Customer Profile, Challenges and Solution.

Share buyer personas with your team and across teams, including sales, customer service and product development. Help everyone get to know what makes your customers tick and what’s important to them so that everyone has a shared understanding. Make use of buyer personas in internal training efforts and when you bring on new team members.

Develop stronger messaging

Detailed buyer personas will help you develop stronger and more compelling messaging in support of your marketing efforts. Better knowledge of your customers allows you to target messaging to their specific needs, goals and challenges. You can more accurately position your products. You’ll be able to focus on the most important benefits.

Developing buyer personas shouldn’t require excessive time and resources on your part, yet the payoff can be significant. Revisit the buyer personas once a year or when your company launches new products, enters new markets or organizational changes occur such as mergers or acquisitions.

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How Industrial Marketing Professionals Use Market Research

Half of industrial marketers now use primary market research to plan their marketing strategy, according to the results of IHS Engineering360 Media Solutions’ latest research report How Industrial Marketers Use Market Research.

Market research is rated as above average in importance by industrial marketers, yet 63 percent spend less than 10 percent of their annual budget on it, and 54 percent say that budget is a primary barrier to using market research. So there is some disconnect on the part of marketers between perceived value and willingness to invest in market research.

market research
Half of industrial marketers now use primary market research to plan their marketing strategy.

Types of research industrial marketers rely on

Primary and Secondary

There are two types of market research: primary and secondary. Half of industrial marketers use primary research, which is new and original research. Those that rely on primary research either conduct it themselves (64 percent), have other internal people do it (63 percent) or hire an outside vendor (46 percent).

Forty-eight percent of industrial marketers use secondary research, which makes use of information previously researched for other purposes and is publicly available. The most popular secondary research sources are Internet search, used by 85 percent, followed by industry analyst reports (78 percent) and books, periodicals and magazines (62 percent). The industry analyst reports most often used come from Forrester, Frost & Sullivan and IHS.

Qualitative and Quantitative

Market research can be qualitative or quantitative in nature. Qualitative research tends to provide information that has depth and subjectivity. Quantitative research is focused on being statistically relevant. Qualitative tactics include one-on-one interviews, phone interviews, usability surveys and focus groups. Quantitative tactics are typically surveys conducted online (the most popular tactic) or by phone or direct mail.

What industrial marketers want to gain from research

For those industrial marketers that conduct primary research, their goals are to gain knowledge about the marketplace/target audience (76 percent), develop competitive analysis (70 percent), understand existing customers (68 percent) and identify potential customers (65 percent). Entering a new market is the top reason why industrial marketers will invest in research.

Five Tips for Creating a Survey

1. Only ask useful questions.

Every question in your survey should have a purpose. The answer to any question should provide data you can use to help make better marketing or business decisions. If it won’t, strike it.

2. Use rating scales in a balanced and consistent manner.

On questions with rating scales, the lowest (or most negative) point should be the worst possible situation and the highest (or most positive) should be the best possible. The labels in between should be evenly spread. For example, “strongly disagree–disagree–neutral–agree–strongly agree” scale is a popular, balanced scale. Your scale direction (negative to positive or vice versa) should always go in the same direction. If “1” is the worst and “5” is the best, keep that rating model consistent throughout.

3. Avoid leading or loaded questions.

These types of questions will give you unreliable data. For example: “Expert reviewers have rated our oscillating water pumps the highest in the industry. Do you agree?” Most respondents will tend to strongly agree or agree with the statement because experts say so. A better way to phrase that question is: “How would you rate our oscillating water pumps?” and provide a rating scale for survey takers to offer their responses.

4. Use a funnel approach.

Ask broad questions first to introduce a topic, followed by more specific or complex questions. This helps your respondents loosen up before getting to the in-depth questions. End with your demographic questions, which are easy to answer.

5. Keep the survey short and simple.

The longer and more complicated your survey, the fewer number of respondents will complete it and some respondents may begin to answer questions without thinking them through. Having clear goals for your survey and making sure each question is relevant and has a purpose will help guide your structure and length. Market research experts agree that 15 minutes is the upper limit of what you can ask for your respondent’s time.

For additional tips on creating and designing market research surveys, and to access all survey results in chart form, download your complimentary copy of the How Industrial Marketers Use Market Research.

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How do industrial marketers measure the success of their marketing initiatives?

Sales attributed to marketing campaigns, customer acquisition and leads are the top three measures of success for industrial marketers.

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4 How do you measure success of marketing initiatives

IHS Engineering360 Media Solutions recently conducted its annual Trends in Industrial Marketing Survey of marketing and sales professionals in the industrial sector.

The online survey addressed the marketing trends, challenges and expenditures within the engineering, technical, manufacturing and industrial communities. This research report analyzes and presents the results of the survey, and offers recommendations to industrial marketers to help them allocate their budget, develop a sound marketing strategy, and plan effective programs and campaigns.

Download your complimentary copy of the report.

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Five Ways to Boost Your Content Marketing Efforts

Eighty-six percent of B2B marketers are using content marketing as a tactic, according to the Content Marketing Institute. However, in the industrial sector, some marketers are still struggling with content marketing.

The 2014 Trends in Industrial Marketing survey reported that just:

  • 29 percent of industrial marketers have a content marketing strategy
  • 15 percent of industrial marketers align their content with the different phases of their customers’ buy cycle.
  • Nine percent can demonstrate how content marketing contributes to sales.

These results reveal valuable opportunities for industrial companies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their content marketing efforts.

To boost your content marketing efforts, here are five guidelines you can follow:

content marketing800

1. Develop a strategy
It’s easy to be overwhelmed by the need to create content when your audience is hungry to consume your good content. You need white papers, webinars, videos, articles, blog posts and so on. But first you need a content strategy. If you put time and resources into planning, developing, delivering and managing relevant content for your target audience, you’ll get better results.

Determine your objectives for content marketing. Is it to raise brand awareness? Educate prospects? Position your company as thought leaders? Generate engagement opportunities? Once you know your objectives, you can plan what type of content will work best to achieve those objectives. You can also make sure your content strategy fits your available budget and resources for the year.

2. Use an editorial calendar
Develop a content calendar at the beginning of the year, so you won’t be panicking later when trying to come up with content ideas. Start at a high level of planning by coming up with 12 monthly topics for the upcoming year. Choose broad themes that are aligned with your content marketing objectives and are relevant to your audience. Add any major milestones to the calendar that may require intensive content, such as online events or webinars or key announcements. Then, once a quarter, flesh out each week with specific ideas, such as how-to videos, blog posts or white paper ideas.

Also be flexible enough to adjust as situations arise. There could be a new trend or major news impacting your industry and you may want to respond with an article, press release or blog post.

3. Re-purpose content
Re-purposing content not only saves time it helps you deliver a consistent message to your audience of technical professionals. As you plan a piece of content, consider all the formats and channels you can use. For example, a blog post is a great way to test new ideas or points of view on industry issues. Some of these posts might lend themselves to longer, more detailed articles on solving problems or explaining technical processes. Or the content of a white paper can be re-purposed into a webinar. A video interview with a customer could become a case study.

4. Align content to the buy cycle
The industrial buy cycle can be long and complex, and include distinct stages from needs awareness to evaluation and consideration, and finally to a purchase decision. Your audience needs different types of content at different stages.

For example, in the early stages, engineers may be searching to find out what suppliers and products in the marketplace have a good reputation and can meet their needs. Articles, white papers, e-newsletters, webinars and online events are all sources of information for technical professionals in these early stages. In the later stages, when customers are close to a buying decision, they may want content such as detailed specification sheets, ROI calculators, specific case studies and service and support information.

Because prospects often don’t contact a supplier until they are close to making a buying decision, you need to publish robust, relevant content for the early buy cycle stages in order to get known and get on a potential customer’s short list for when they do decide to make contact.

5. Demonstrate results
With digital media, many metrics are available to track the effectiveness of your content marketing. Page views, clicks, shares, downloads, conversions and more can all be counted. These types of metrics will tell you about the popularity of any given piece of content, but this is only part of the equation when it comes to demonstrating results. You probably need to take a more holistic view.

Technical professionals will likely interact with your content a number of times before reaching the point where they are ready to make purchase decision. Each one of those interactions and each piece of content they access contribute to the sale. Therefore, tracking your customers through their journey by capturing their interactions with your content is a smart way to demonstrate results. You’ll be able to see how your broader content strategy is working and spot trends showing what types of content most often contribute to a sale.

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2015 Marketing Planning Part 2: Measuring Return on Marketing Investment

Financially focused executives are putting unprecedented pressure on industrial marketers to demonstrate return on marketing investment (ROMI) for their initiatives.

This pressure often leads marketers to examine each marketing program individually, asking questions such as: How many new customers did our webinar deliver? How much revenue did our e-newsletter ad produce?

Not only are these questions extremely difficult to answer in isolation, they may not be the best questions to be asking. The reason is it’s unlikely that any single campaign or tactic can be correlated on a one-to-one basis with a sale, especially in the industrial sector where the buy cycle can be long and complex.

Still, you need to demonstrate ROMI and should be making your marketing plans for 2015 with that in mind. Here are five tips to help you.

marketing planning

1. Understand the relationship between ROMI and the buy cycle
The industrial buy cycle consists of multiple stages, from needs assessment to comparison and evaluation, to a final purchasing decision. In most cases, buyers will interact with your brand and content multiple times through a variety of digital channels, often before they contact you, and each interaction and channel influences the buying decision.

For example, a prospective buyer might download a white paper, attend a webinar, watch a video, connect with you at an online event, search your online product catalog, and type your company name into a search engine—all before contacting your sales team. Each of these touch points are part of your broader marketing plan of creating brand awareness, building thought leadership and generating engagement opportunities. And all of them contribute to moving a prospective buyer closer to a sale. Therefore, it’s difficult to measure ROMI on any given tactic. However, you can measure relevant metrics for each tactic.

2. Commit to measurable programs
You can’t manage what you can’t measure. Yes, it’s a cliché, but only because it expresses a universal truth. By committing only to measurable programs in your 2015 marketing plan, you are laying the foundation for determining ROMI. Fortunately, the best-performing programs today, and the channels technical professionals turn to most for work-related purposes, are digital media. And digital media by its nature is measurable. You can track impressions, clicks, inquiries, shares and likes, conversions, downloads, time on page, length of view and more.

3. Measure ROMI for early stages of the buy cycle
Although many customers don’t initiate contact with a vendor until later in their buy cycle, you can still demonstrate ROI of marketing efforts that support customers in the earlier buy cycle stages.

For example, web page accesses, clicks, content downloads, video views, webinar attendance, and mentions or shares on social media can all be tracked and tied to your marketing efforts. These important metrics measure customer awareness, interest and engagement with your brand, products and services. If your measurements in these areas continue to increase over time, then you can assume your marketing is helping potential customers through the early stages of their buy cycle and contributing to the engagement opportunity when they do contact your sales team.

This type of ROI measurement is every bit as important as tying tactics to sales, because without effective marketing in the early buy cycle stages, you won’t gain nearly as many opportunities for your sales team.

4. Maximize your digital presence
Your products, solutions and brand need to be found in various places online in order to connect with technical professionals, all of whom have individual preferences for what digital media channels they prefer. Technical professionals have many options and visit multiple websites to discover new suppliers and learn about products during the course of their work. Allocating your marketing investments across a balanced mix of channels keeps you from missing potential engagement opportunities, plus you can compare performance across channels.

5. Don’t make the “last-click” assumption
The “last click” assumption attributes a sale to the last marketing touch point a customer has with your company before making a buying decision. This is a mistake because the buy cycle includes many touches that cumulatively add up to help achieve a sale. Today’s path through the buy cycle crosses multiple devices, platforms, sites, and user needs and behaviors. Last click ignores all the other marketing touch points and tactics that help drive a purchasing decision.

It’s better to take the position that multiple exposures to your brand, especially early in the buy cycle, will have a cumulative effect and will help a prospect think of your company as a preferred/considered brand, and therefore more likely to contact you at some point. While this makes the last marketing touch point relevant, other exposures to your brand can contribute just as much or even more to your success.

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How to Craft Content for the Three Types of Industrial Buyers

The industrial buy cycle can be long and complex, and can involve any number of recommenders, influencers, gatekeepers and decision makers who all have a say in the final purchase decision. It’s a daunting task for a marketer to create content and design communications that are relevant and that resonate with these various audience types.

To make your job easier, you can segment all of those involved on the customer side into one of three buyer types: the analytical buyer, the economic buyer and the technical buyer. Speak to the needs and interests of these three types of buyers and you can simplify your communication efforts while increasing your opportunities for winning the deal.

industrial buyers

The Analytical Buyer: Will it Solve My Problem?
The analytical buyer is the technical professional who has a problem to solve. They need, for example, an oscillating pump or a diode laser or a circuit board to perform a specific function. The analytical buyer is often the first point of contact your company has with a potential customer. They’re the person who has performed initial research to identify the suppliers, products or components that could meet their needs.

The biggest question on the analytical buyer’s mind is whether your product or service will solve their problem. They’re asking: What functions does the product perform? What are its specifications? Why is your product better than another product? Or: How does your service meet my needs?

Analytical buyers want facts and solutions. They respond to content such as demos, how-to videos, problem-solving webinars, and white papers.

The Economic Buyer: Will We Earn ROI?
The economic buyer’s greatest concern is return on investment. They often have significant sway in any large or long-term purchase. Economic buyers asking that if their company buys your product or service, will the return they earn in terms of economic benefit be higher than the price they pay?

The benefits to economic buyers might be measured in terms of expected time savings, increased efficiency, uptime, product lifespan, reliability, warranties, opportunity cost (if they purchase your product over a competitive one, how do they gain or lose) or other factors.

Effective content for the economic buyer might be interactive ROI calculators, case studies showing demonstrated success and benefits other customers have achieved, analyst reports, depreciation schedules, and executive briefs. The content should be numbers oriented and benefit focused.

The Technical Buyer: Is it the Right Fit for Our Company?
The technical buyer is often behind the scenes and may not come into play early in the buy cycle. They are concerned with the bigger picture of whether your product, component or service will fit into the larger technical infrastructure, environment or policies at their company. For example: Are your products compatible with other products the customer uses? Do your products integrate well or will modifications elsewhere be necessary? How is support provided? These questions are particularly relevant with software and hardware purchases, but also for other industrial products.

Fitting into environment also includes questions such as: Is this kind of company we want to do business with? If the customer has a policy to prefer suppliers that engage in “green” business practices, or that manufacture only in the United States, you’ll find this out from the technical buyer. Also, if the customer requires a certain type of support, such as on-site or 24/7, the technical buyer as well as the analytical buyer will be looking for that type of information.

Technical buyers want specifications, but they also want to see your policies and procedures. They can nix a sale for any number of reasons, and so you’ll have to produce content that answers their questions.

The Buyers Together
You might produce individual pieces of content for each type of buyer or you might try to communicate with all your audiences at once. There are no set rules other than to be clear and relevant to your customers and to address their concerns: Does your product do the job well, deliver required benefits, and fit seamlessly into their environment?

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Three Tips for a More Effective Multichannel Strategy

With engineers and technical professionals using a variety of digital resources for work related purposes, industrial marketers must deploy a multichannel strategy to attract new customers and connect with current ones. But it takes more than simply placing advertising in different digital media channels.

Instead, you must be able to deliver a seamless, consistent experience across multiple channels in order to build confidence and trust among your target audience and increase opportunities to win business.

Being consistent and seamless requires that the attributes and value of your brand come across to your customers at all times, on all channels. Many customers might be exposed to your company through multiple channels: e-newsletters, websites, online catalogs, webinars, online events, banner ads and more.

You don’t have to—and shouldn’t want to—use the exact same message across channels, or make all your creative and layout look the same, but you should find the appropriate threads to weave through your marketing that will cause potential customers to recognize and understand your brand at every digital touch point. Here’s how:

Cross Media Multiplier Effect

1. Anticipate multiple exposures
There’s a theory that a potential customer has to interact with your company up to seven times before they’re ready to make a purchasing decision. If you’re truly deploying a multichannel strategy, you should work under the assumption that engineers and technical professionals will be exposed to your company numerous times across multiple digital channels.

For example, the person who sees your ad in an e-newsletter might click through to your website and later might view a video on your YouTube channel and read one of your tweets or blog posts. Provide visual consistency by using similar colors, layouts, fonts and other design elements across channels and content.

Provide message consistency by reminding your audience of your brand value. How do you want your audience to perceive you: Are you a technology innovator? A low-cost provider? Known for stellar customer service? Find a way to reinforce your major brand message, even if the specific marketing campaign is more focused.

2. Plan your content
Be the company that is always putting out fresh content on multiple digital channels. The latest news on your products or trends in the industry. A new white paper, video or webinar. If you strive to constantly refresh your content, it will be easier to maintain consistency and deliver a seamless experience across channels.

In addition, create a schedule for publishing content so that you know when and where your content will appear. This will help you avoid, for example, having last month’s story still promoted on your social media platforms while this week’s e-newsletter concerns itself with more recent topics. Remember that not every channel has to carry the same message or news (which would be dull), but they do have to work together and you have to be aware of what’s appearing where.

3. Tie it all back to your website
A good portion of your marketing effort is likely devoted to funneling customers to your website where they can accept your offers, make a purchase, contact you or interact with your company, brand and content in other ways. Whether a potential customer is exposed to your company through a banner ad, e-newsletter, online catalog, social media post or other channel, every potential customer that clicks through to your website should immediately recognize something familiar, whether it’s a message you want to continually reinforce or a consistent look and feel you want to promote.

If you integrate all the components of your multichannel marketing strategy in these ways, not only will you provide a consistent, seamless and memorable experience to your target audience, you will create the impression of being everywhere in the digital sphere. Customers will see and recognize your presence, which will help form a stronger and longer lasting connection with your brand, company and products.

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2015 Marketing Planning Part 1: Generating Results in Today’s Digital Environment

Now is the time to begin formulating your marketing strategy and developing plans for 2015. In Part 1 of this two-part series, we’ll look at how you must account for the dramatically changing marketing landscape due to the rise of digital media.

In the early days of digital, industrial companies could get by simply with a company website. This is no longer the case. Today there is an influx of new and relevant digital channels. Technical professionals now have more digital tools and sources of information to do their jobs better and more efficiently. Consider this new reality brought about by the "digital disruption:"

  • Technical professionals are exposed to more companies than ever before—which means more competition for you—because suppliers of every size are building a strong digital presence, giving potential customers more choices in terms of who they do business with.
  • Technical professionals have more personalized preferences and more control in how they choose to interact with suppliers, and often don’t engage with a supplier until later in their buy cycle because they can do so much of their research and evaluation online.
business solution puzzle 2

The takeaway for marketers is that it’s no longer enough to use a limited suite of digital channels to connect with customers and prospects. To be successful today, you need a broad and deep online presence. Expanding your media program to multiple channels will get your name and brand front and center across all stages of the buy cycle, which you need to build awareness and stay competitive. This phenomenon—that you can achieve higher ROI allocating your resources across multiple channels than you can by relying on a single method—is called the Cross Media Multiplier. In essence, it means the whole is great than the sum of its parts.

Of course, you likely don’t have a bottomless budget that will allow you to take advantage of all the digital channels available to you—from online events, webinars and catalogs to newsletters, custom emails, social media, your own website and more. The question is how to allocate your marketing resources in 2015 to optimize results and achieve your marketing goals. Here are three tips to help in your planning:

1. Use the channels your customers use.
Search engines, online catalogs and supplier websites are the three big channels that technical professionals use when researching a work-related purchase. They belong in your mix. But technical professionals also use a variety of other digital channels to keep up with the latest technologies, product news and companies—and these channels and the information technical professionals get from them all influence their buying decisions. E-newsletters, industry websites, online events and webinars are all important channels for your customers and should be considered as part of your marketing suite. Be sure to allocate some of your budget to these channels.

2. Include both creative and directional advertising in your marketing portfolio.
Creative advertising builds awareness for your brand in the marketplace. Creative advertising occurs near the top of the sales funnel and helps your target audience discover who you are, what you have to offer, and how you can provide value. Examples might be an e-newsletter sponsorship, banner ad, online event or social media. Directional advertising is more mid- to end-funnel focused and can lure in technical professionals when they are looking for a specific product or component and need to find the right supplier. Examples are supplier directories, online catalogs and optimizing your website content for search. You need both types of advertising to be 1) recognized by your potential customers, and 2) chosen when the time comes to buy.

3. Work with experts.
Your media partners, including IHS Engineering360, have a wealth of knowledge about the digital media landscape and how it functions. They can offer you guidance in matching your marketing goals and budget with the right mix of digital channels to achieve the results you need. Reach out early to your media partners and get your plans in place for 2015 so you can begin the next year with momentum.

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What do Industrial Marketers Consider the Biggest Challenge in their Profession?

Generating leads for sales and measuring the ROI of marketing efforts are the main challenges industrial marketers face.

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2 biggest marketing challenge

IHS Engineering360 Media Solutions recently conducted its annual Trends in Industrial Marketing Survey of marketing and sales professionals in the industrial sector.

The online survey addressed the marketing trends, challenges and expenditures within the engineering, technical, manufacturing and industrial communities. This research report analyzes and presents the results of the survey, and offers recommendations to industrial marketers to help them allocate their budget, develop a sound marketing strategy, and plan effective programs and campaigns.

Download your complimentary copy of the report.

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